Seabourn 2021 World Cruise

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Travel now, pay later
0% 9 months interest free†
Weekly
$2308*
Monthly
$10000*
This deal expires on the 31st May 2020

    Onboard experience

    The second of Seabourn’s new class of ships, Seabourn Sojourn, was also built at T. Mariotti yard in Genoa. Her debut was on June 6, 2010 in the middle of the River Thames in London. Seabourn Sojourn’s godmother was the English fashion icon and actress Twiggy. Like her sisters, Seabourn Sojourn enchants her guests with an array of public areas scaled to encourage a relaxed sociability. One of the most unusual features of Seabourn Sojourn and her sisters is Seabourn Square, an ingenious “living room” that replaces the traditional cruise ship lobby with a welcoming lounge filled with easy chairs, sofas and cocktail tables. An enclave in its center houses knowledgeable concierges discreetly seated at individual desks, ready to handle all sorts of business or give advice and information. The ship’s shops are conveniently located just off the Square and it has its own open terrace aft. The Spa at Seabourn is the largest on any ultra-luxury ship, 11,400 square feet encompassing indoor and outdoor space over two decks. A variety of open terraces are scattered over seven decks, offering places to gather with a few friends or spend an isolated hour with a book. Seabourn Sojourn offers six whirlpools and two swimming pools, including the Pool Patio, with a pair of large whirlpool spas and a “beach” style pool, a casual Patio Grill and the Patio Bar. On the sun deck above sits Seabourn’s popular open-air Sky Bar. High atop Deck 11 is a Sun Terrace with 36 tiered double sun beds. Just aft of that is The Retreat, with shuffleboard courts and a nine-hole putting green. The panoramic Observation Bar on Deck 10 offers 270° forward views over the sea. The Club is a lively spot for dancing before and after dinner, while the larger Grand Salon is used for dancing as well as lectures, production vocal shows, cabaret performances and classical recitals.

    What's included

    Outside from: $89999
    Balcony from: $103999
    Suite from: $193999
    Return Business Class airfare from Australia into Miami and out of Barcelona including prepaid taxes
    140 Night cruise, from Miami to Barcelona, onboard the Seabourn Sojourn in an Outside twin share cabin
    All main meals and entertainment on board
    All dining venues are complimentary
    Complimentary wines & spirits & open bars throughout the ship
    In-suite bar and refrigerator stocked with your preferences
    Port charges and government fees
    Gratuities are not expected or required
    BONUS SAVINGS OFFERS Exclusively For Full World Cruise Guests:
    50% Reduced Deposit valid for bookings made prior to 31 March 2020
    3% Pay-in-Full Additional Savings valid for guests who pay in full by 31 May 2020
    BONUS COMPLIMENTARY WORLD CRUISE AMENITIES WHEN BOOKED BY 31 MAY 2020:
    Round-trip Business-Class Airfares
    USD $4,000* Shipboard Credit per Person for Oceanview or Veranda Suites
    USD $6,000* Shipboard Credit per Person for Penthouse or Premiums Suites
    Unlimited Internet Package
    Private Car Transfers Door-to-Door between Home and Airport
    Personal Valet Luggage Shipping Service Between Home and Ship in Miami and Barcelona
    Unlimited Laundry and Dry Cleaning On Board
    Gala Bon Voyage World Cruise Dinner and Overnight Hotel Stay Prior to Departure in Miami
    Three Exclusive World Cruise Events
    Special World Cruise Pillow Gifts
    Please speak to your Travel Consultant as Terms & Conditions apply

    Facilities

    Food and Drink: The Restaurant, The Colonnade, Patio Grill, In-Suite Service, The Restaurant 2, Sky Bar
    Fitness: Gym, Sports Deck
    Relaxation: Thalassotherapy Pool, Sauna, Facial Treatments, Whirlpool, Beauty Salon, Massage, Spa, Swimming Pool

    Itinerary

    • Day 1 - Miami, Florida
    • Day 2 - Key West, Florida The renowned natural beauty of the Florida Keys has attracted writers, artists and musicians for generations. Key West, with its carefully preserved "Old Town," boasts one of the largest numbers of historic structures in any U.S. city. Key West's "Conch-style" architecture reflects a unique blend of Victorian gingerbread, New England cottage and Bahamian influence. Narrow streets are lined with stately mansions and "shotgun" cottages, each an important part of this historic town at the tip of the Keys.
    • Day 3 - At Sea
    • Day 4 - Belize City, Belize As the center and one-time capital of the country, Belize City boasts an array of historic attractions - St. John's Cathedral, the Swing Bridge, Government House Museum and the colorful fruit market, all of which can be seen on a city tour.
    • Day 5 - Santo Tomas De Castilla, Guatemala
    • Day 6 - Banana Coast (Trujillo), Honduras
    • Day 7 - At Sea
    • Day 8 - Puerto Limon
    • Day 9 - Enter Panama Canal Cristobal
    • Day 9 - Cruising Panama Canal And Gatun Lake
    • Day 9 - Exit Panama Canal Balboa
    • Day 10 - Fuerte Amador (Panama City), Panama Formerly a fortified armory, this newly developed port is the portal to colonial Panama City and an in-depth look at Miraflores Locks. Also from here, you can visit an Embera Indian village.
    • Day 11 - Crossing the Equator
    • Day 12 - Manta, Ecuador Manta is Ecuador's second largest port, north of Guayaquil which is the largest, and just south of the equator. With a population of approximately 140,000, Manta is a commercial center for fish and fruit, particularly bananas and plantains, which thrive in the tropical climate. However its beaches and quaint fishing villages have long attracted tourists. Shrimp, tuna and giant blue and striped marlin run in abundance in the waters off its coastal plain. Manta's culture is a vibrant patchwork of the heritage and traditions of the country's early Native American, Spanish and black African slave settlers.
    • Day 13 - Manta, Ecuador Manta is Ecuador's second largest port, north of Guayaquil which is the largest, and just south of the equator. With a population of approximately 140,000, Manta is a commercial center for fish and fruit, particularly bananas and plantains, which thrive in the tropical climate. However its beaches and quaint fishing villages have long attracted tourists. Shrimp, tuna and giant blue and striped marlin run in abundance in the waters off its coastal plain. Manta's culture is a vibrant patchwork of the heritage and traditions of the country's early Native American, Spanish and black African slave settlers.
    • Day 14 - At Sea
    • Day 15 - At Sea
    • Day 16 - Callao (Lima), Peru A 45-minute drive from the port city of Callao brings you to exciting Lima, the City of Kings. From its founding in 1535 until today, it remains one of the most important cities in all South America. The handsome old buildings from the earliest colonial days surrounding the Plaza de Armas contrast with the soaring modern towers rising in the newer sections of the city.
    • Day 17 - Callao (Lima), Peru A 45-minute drive from the port city of Callao brings you to exciting Lima, the City of Kings. From its founding in 1535 until today, it remains one of the most important cities in all South America. The handsome old buildings from the earliest colonial days surrounding the Plaza de Armas contrast with the soaring modern towers rising in the newer sections of the city.
    • Day 18 - At Sea
    • Day 19 - At Sea
    • Day 20 - At Sea
    • Day 21 - At Sea
    • Day 22 - At Sea
    • Day 23 - Easter Island, Chile
    • Day 24 - Easter Island, Chile
    • Day 25 - At Sea
    • Day 26 - At Sea
    • Day 27 - At Sea
    • Day 28 - Pitcairn Island
    • Day 29 - At Sea
    • Day 30 - At Sea
    • Day 31 - At Sea
    • Day 32 - Papeete, French Polynesia The islands of French Polynesia are acclaimed as the most beautiful in the South Pacific. Tahiti is the largest of the Polynesian islands and home to the capital city of Papeete, a delightful blend of cultures. Papeete, meaning the "water basket," was once a gathering place where Tahitians came to fill their calabashes with fresh water. Today, it is the gateway to the country, and boasts romantic resorts, fine dining, vibrant markets, pearl shops, and boutiques. Tahiti's mountainous interior is adorned with deep valleys and scenic waterfalls, while the rugged coastal lands are home to fields of tropical flowers, and glorious white and black sand beaches.
    • Day 33 - Papeete, French Polynesia The islands of French Polynesia are acclaimed as the most beautiful in the South Pacific. Tahiti is the largest of the Polynesian islands and home to the capital city of Papeete, a delightful blend of cultures. Papeete, meaning the "water basket," was once a gathering place where Tahitians came to fill their calabashes with fresh water. Today, it is the gateway to the country, and boasts romantic resorts, fine dining, vibrant markets, pearl shops, and boutiques. Tahiti's mountainous interior is adorned with deep valleys and scenic waterfalls, while the rugged coastal lands are home to fields of tropical flowers, and glorious white and black sand beaches.
    • Day 34 - Bora Bora, French Polynesia Bora Bora, has long been noted for its stunning beauty. A tiny island, less than 20 miles in circumference, Bora Bora is dominated by the castle-like Mount Otemanu and Mount Pahia, two volcanic peaks with lush tropical slopes. A protective coral reef encloses Bora Bora, and the lagoon is dotted with colorful motus, or islets. Perfect white-sand beaches give way to brilliant turquoise and sapphire-colored waters, and locals in the small village of Viatape sell colorful fabrics, sculptures carved from native wood and precious black pearls.
    • Day 35 - At Sea
    • Day 36 - Arutanga, Aitutaki, Cook Island
    • Day 37 - Rarotonga, Cook Islands Rarotonga was one of the last of the Cook Islands to be visited by European ships, but since its "discovery," it was always a favorite of sailors and merchants. Today, Rarotonga is the most populous island of the Cook Islands, and the location of the country's capital, Avarua. Isolated for years from major tourist routes, travelers began to arrive in Rarotonga following the opening of the international airport in 1974, many lured by the untouched beauty of pristine white sand beaches edged with swaying palms and crystal-clear lagoons.
    • Day 38 - At Sea
    • Day 39 - Cross International Dateline
    • Day 40 - At Sea
    • Day 41 - Vava U, Tonga
    • Day 42 - Nuku' Alofa, Tonga
    • Day 43 - At Sea
    • Day 44 - Suva, Viti Levu, Fiji Islands
    • Day 45 - Dravuni Island, Fiji
    • Day 46 - At Sea
    • Day 47 - Port Vila, Vanuatu The Vanuatu archipelago, consisting of 13 large islands and 60 smaller islands stretches for 450 miles through the southwest Pacific Ocean. Formerly known as New Hebrides, the name was changed to Vanuatu when the nation gained independence in 1980. An abundance of vividly colored flowers brighten the islands along with fifty-four types of native birds, among them green pigeons and multihued parrots. The warm waters, calm lagoons and miles of beautiful beaches provide the visitor to this off-the-beaten-path island with a perfect setting for a variety of recreational activities.
    • Day 48 - Luganville, Vanuatu
    • Day 49 - At Sea
    • Day 50 - Tavanipupu, Solomon Islands
    • Day 51 - Honiara
    • Day 52 - At Sea
    • Day 53 - Alotau
    • Day 54 - Kitava
    • Day 55 - Conflict Islands
    • Day 56 - At Sea
    • Day 57 - Cairns, Australia A cosmopolitan city flanked by pristine rainforests and golden beaches, Cairns is the gateway to the Great Barrier Reef, Kuranda, and the Daintree rainforest, a World Heritage protected area. The city was recently renovated to enhance its image and provide a relaxing place for visitors and locals to congregate and have fun. Cairns Esplanade, once a huge grassy park, now features an excellent facility incorporating an outdoor amphitheatre, a sandy swimming lagoon, walking tracks, shops and restaurants, and an environmental interpretation center.
    • Day 58 - At Sea
    • Day 59 - At Sea
    • Day 60 - At Sea
    • Day 61 - Sydney, Australia Sydney is a cosmopolitan, multicultural city surrounded by golden sand beaches, World Heritage areas, lush national parks and acclaimed wine regions. Sydney owes much of its splendor to its magnificent harbor. Arriving by ship provides an unequaled impression, showing off the city's famous landmarks: the dramatic white sails of the iconic Opera House and the celebrated Harbor Bridge, looming over the skyline.
    • Day 62 - At Sea
    • Day 63 - Phillip Island, Victoria, Australia
    • Day 64 - Melbourne, Australia Located at the mouth of the Yarra River, Melbourne was founded by free settlers in 1835, 47 years after the first European settlement in Australia. Transformed rapidly into a major metropolis by the Victorian gold rush in the 1850s, Melbourne became Australia's largest and most important city, and by 1865 was the second largest city in the British Empire. Today, Melbourne is a major center of commerce, industry and cultural activity, and is consistently ranked as one of the most livable cities in the world.
    • Day 65 - Melbourne, Australia Located at the mouth of the Yarra River, Melbourne was founded by free settlers in 1835, 47 years after the first European settlement in Australia. Transformed rapidly into a major metropolis by the Victorian gold rush in the 1850s, Melbourne became Australia's largest and most important city, and by 1865 was the second largest city in the British Empire. Today, Melbourne is a major center of commerce, industry and cultural activity, and is consistently ranked as one of the most livable cities in the world.
    • Day 66 - At Sea
    • Day 67 - Adelaide, Australia Southern Australia's most graceful city lies nestled along the coastal plain between the Gulf St. Vincent and the Adelaide Hills. Unlike its eastern Australian city counterparts, convicts did not colonize Adelaide. Europeans, most of whom were British, first settled Adelaide in 1826. Other settlers to the region included German, Polish, Afghan, Chinese, Italian, Lebanese, Spanish and Scandinavians. The city was designed from the very beginning with wide streets and numerous town squares, marvelous Victorian and Edwardian architecture, parks and wide-open spaces. The city preserved many of its unique stone houses built by the original settlers, as well as the more grand historic public buildings constructed during the Gold Rush years.
    • Day 68 - Penneshaw, Kangaroo Island
    • Day 69 - Penneshaw, Kangaroo Island
    • Day 70 - At Sea
    • Day 71 - At Sea
    • Day 71 - Albany, Australia
    • Day 72 - At Sea
    • Day 73 - Bunbury, Western Australia
    • Day 74 - Fremantle (Perth), Australia Historic Fremantle is the gateway port for Perth, the capital of Western Australia. Located 12 miles upriver from Fremantle on the banks of the Swan River, Perth was founded on June12, 1829 by Captain James Stirling, the political center of the free settler Swan River Colony. Perth is considered one of the most isolated metropolitan areas on Earth, with Adelaide in South Australia, the closest city with a population over one million. Perth is geographically closer to East Timor, Singapore and Jakarta than it is to Sydney or Melbourne. Today, Perth is a lively cosmopolitan city, and the Swan Valley Region is home to more that 40 vineyards, many of which are still run by their original families. Perth became known worldwide as the "City of Lights" when city residents lit their house and street lights as American astronaut John Glenn passed overhead while orbiting the earth on Friendship 7 in 1962.
    • Day 75 - At Sea
    • Day 76 - At Sea
    • Day 77 - At Sea
    • Day 78 - Broome
    • Day 79 - At Sea
    • Day 80 - At Sea
    • Day 81 - Benoa (Denpasar), Indonesia Located on the southeastern coast of Bali is the small village of Tanjung Benoa. Still considered a fishing village, Benoa has developed over the past 20 years into a major player in the tourism sector. The calm waters and the beautiful white sand beaches have made Benoa the prime water sport area of Bali. Being a peninsula that is only accessible from one direction, Tanjung Benoa is still relatively quiet with a more relaxed feeling.
    • Day 82 - Benoa (Denpasar), Indonesia Located on the southeastern coast of Bali is the small village of Tanjung Benoa. Still considered a fishing village, Benoa has developed over the past 20 years into a major player in the tourism sector. The calm waters and the beautiful white sand beaches have made Benoa the prime water sport area of Bali. Being a peninsula that is only accessible from one direction, Tanjung Benoa is still relatively quiet with a more relaxed feeling.
    • Day 83 - Surabaya, Indonesia Surabaya is Indonesia's second-largest city with a population of over 2.7 million (5.6 million in the metropolitan area), and the capital of the province of East Java. Shoppers will enjoy the extensive shopping centers and boutiques throughout the city. Others may wish to take in Bonbin Surabaya, one of the largest zoos in Southeast Asia. Other points of interest include the Grand Mosque of Surabaya (the largest mosque in East Java), the Mpu Tantular Museum of Javanese culture, and the Submarine Monument, also known as Monumen Kapal Selam. City sightseeing buses with English-speaking tour guides are available at the House of Sampoerna museum.
    • Day 84 - Semarang, Java, Indonesia Semarang is a commercial port located roughly halfway between Jakarta and Surabaya, along Java's north central coast. Today, many of the island's most important exports, including tobacco, sugar, rubber, coffee, and cacao are shipped through Semarang. Because of its accessibility to the island's interior, it is an ideal gateway to numerous coffee plantations and the spectacular UNESCO World Heritage Site of Borobudur.
    • Day 85 - At Sea
    • Day 86 - At Sea
    • Day 87 - At Sea
    • Day 88 - At Sea
    • Day 89 - At Sea
    • Day 90 - At Sea
    • Day 91 - At Sea
    • Day 92 - At Sea
    • Day 93 - At Sea
    • Day 94 - At Sea
    • Day 95 - Victoria, Mahe, Seychelles
    • Day 96 - Praslin, Seychelles Known for its glorious tropical beaches and fantastic marine life, Praslin is unique because of its Vallee de Mai World Heritage Site, where the coco de mer grows wild. At seven miles long and nowhere more than 3 1/2 miles wide, it is still the second largest island in the Seychelles.
    • Day 97 - At Sea
    • Day 98 - At Sea
    • Day 99 - Mombassa, Kenya
    • Day 100 - Mombassa, Kenya
    • Day 101 - Mombassa, Kenya
    • Day 102 - Zanzibar, Tanzania Lying in the warm waters off the coast of Tanzania is the exotic island of Zanzibar. The mere mention of this spot conjures up images of intrigue and mystery. Zanzibar's history is whispered on the tropical breezes that cool the island. They tell of the slave trade which flourished here, and of a building called the ``House of Wonders.' They tell of a time when Christian missionaries lived and worked under difficult conditions.
    • Day 103 - At Sea
    • Day 104 - At Sea
    • Day 105 - At Sea
    • Day 106 - At Sea
    • Day 107 - Durban, South Africa At its founding in 1835, the city was named in honor of the then Governor of the Cape, Sir Benjamin D'Urban. Sugar cane transformed Durban into a vital port city, and its attractive parks and meticulously groomed gardens continue to testify to the land's richness. Today, the city sprawls along the coast, its golden beaches hugging the ice-blue Indian Ocean.
    • Day 108 - At Sea
    • Day 109 - Port Elizabeth, South Africa Port Elizabeth is one of South Africa’s largest cities, (second in area and fifth in population), stretching 16 miles along the bay named “Algoa” by the Portuguese. The name indicated that it was from here their trading ships departed for the Goa coast of India on the favorable monsoon winds. Today it is renowned as a playground on the Indian Ocean coast, the breezes attracting surfers and yachtsmen to sport in the warm seas. The 2010 FIFA World Cup was held here, and spread even further its reputation as a world-class beach resort.
    • Day 110 - Passing the Cape of Good Hope
    • Day 111 - Cape Town, South Africa Nestled at the foot of Table Mountain and flanked by Devil's Peak and Lion's Head, Cape Town is known by South Africans simply as 'the Cape,' an acknowledgment of its uniqueness and its status as the Mother City. The first area to be settled by Europeans in the 17th century, it is today a major seaport and the legislative capital of South Africa. The feeling here is not African but cosmopolitan, and a sense of history remains.
    • Day 112 - Cape Town, South Africa Nestled at the foot of Table Mountain and flanked by Devil's Peak and Lion's Head, Cape Town is known by South Africans simply as 'the Cape,' an acknowledgment of its uniqueness and its status as the Mother City. The first area to be settled by Europeans in the 17th century, it is today a major seaport and the legislative capital of South Africa. The feeling here is not African but cosmopolitan, and a sense of history remains.
    • Day 113 - At Sea
    • Day 114 - Luderitz, Namibia In 1883, a German businessman, Adolf Luderitz, purchased a parcel of land enclosing a small bay for purposes of speculation. The so-called Skeleton Coast had limited potential in many ways, being largely made up of the shifting sands of the Namib Desert. Then, in 1906, a local railway worker noticed an oddly sparkly stone beside the tracks. It proved to be a diamond, and it became clear that there were many like it lying literally on the surface of the sands. By 1909 a diamond rush was in full sway, and a thriving, German-styled town called Kolmanskop sprouted out of the desert to house the gem-seekers. When the easy pickings ended, the townspeople simply walked away, and the desert climate preserved the town as it was slowly engulfed by the shifting sands. Today it makes an evocative and haunting place to visit. The bay still hosts a bounty of wildlife as well, including seals, whales and flamingos. Other endeavors have started, too, such as the culture of delicious oysters in the clean, cold ocean waters.
    • Day 115 - Walvis Bay, Namibia Its name in Afrikaans means "Whale Bay," but those days are long gone. Today its dramatic setting is inseparable from any impression of this deep-water port on Namibia's desolate, but beautiful "Skeleton Coast." Here the undulating dunes of the Namib Desert meet the sea, and its lagoon is spangled with white pelicans, pink flamingos and other seabirds. Up the coast road is Dune Seven, the highest along Namibia's coast, and a great place to take off your shoes and feel some sand between your toes after your Atlantic crossing.
    • Day 116 - Walvis Bay, Namibia Its name in Afrikaans means "Whale Bay," but those days are long gone. Today its dramatic setting is inseparable from any impression of this deep-water port on Namibia's desolate, but beautiful "Skeleton Coast." Here the undulating dunes of the Namib Desert meet the sea, and its lagoon is spangled with white pelicans, pink flamingos and other seabirds. Up the coast road is Dune Seven, the highest along Namibia's coast, and a great place to take off your shoes and feel some sand between your toes after your Atlantic crossing.
    • Day 117 - At Sea
    • Day 118 - At Sea
    • Day 119 - At Sea
    • Day 120 - At Sea
    • Day 121 - Crossing the Equator
    • Day 122 - At Sea
    • Day 123 - At Sea
    • Day 124 - At Sea
    • Day 125 - At Sea
    • Day 126 - At Sea
    • Day 127 - At Sea
    • Day 128 - At Sea
    • Day 129 - Banjul, Gambia
    • Day 130 - Dakar, Senegal
    • Day 131 - At Sea
    • Day 132 - Praia, Ilha de Santiago, Cape Verde Santiago is the largest of the Cape Verde islands, and nearly half the nation’s population lives on the island. Originally volcanic, Santiago is unusually fertile, and agriculture is an important part of the islands’ economy. The Cape Verde Islands only won their independence from Portugal in 1974, following a violent revolution. The nation is struggling valiantly to progress after a repressive history. Accordingly visitors will notice a striking difference in development between it and many of its neighbors. The Cape Verdeans, though, are friendly and optimistic, and welcoming to visitors. The old capital, formerly known as Cidade Velha, has been renamed Ribeira Grande de Santiago, which was its name when it was an important port in the infamous slave trade. Dating from 1466, it was the first European colonial settlement in the Tropics. Visitors will notice a cluster of well-restored colonial-period houses, as well as a monument to the original pelourinho, or pillory where slaves were both punished and sold. This area is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
    • Day 133 - Mindelo, Cape Verde The most important city on the Cape Verde island of São Vicente, Mindelo originally thrived as a coal depot for steamships plying the Atlantic. With the advent of diesel engines, its importance waned, although it is still an important port for the maritime trade. The island is volcanic, dry and mostly low. The town has replica of Lisbon’s Belem Tower, located near the fish market, in an interesting part of the city. The late Cape Verdean singer Cesaria Evora started her career singing in the taverns of Mindelo, and later brought the uniquely lilting Cape Verdean form of fado music to the world through her bestselling records and concert tours.
    • Day 134 - At Sea
    • Day 135 - At Sea
    • Day 136 - Las Palmas, Spain Las Palmas is a large Spanish city, which just happens to be on the island of Gran Canaria. That fact adds the exotic, slightly African and international flavor to the place. It played an important part in the early exploration and exploitation of Africa and the New World, some of which is recounted in the Casa de Colon Museum. Columbus may have slept there, but it was never his house. It was actually the mansion of early governors. Other museums of note are the Museo Canaria with a number of Cro Magnon skulls, and the fascinating Elder Museum of Science and Technology. For shopping, strolling and general local interest, head to La Vegueta, the oldest quarter and a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and the adjacent Triana high street shopping district. Most visitors are here for the beaches, and the municipal Playa de Las Canteras is a long, clean and safe option if that is your intention. The Canaria in the name of the islands refers to the indigenous Presa Canaria breed of dogs, which are large, strong and made quite an impression on the earliest Spanish visitors.
    • Day 137 - Arrecife, Canary Islands Lanzarote is the northernmost of the Canary Islands, often known as "volcano island." Its capital is Arrecife, a quiet town of about 30,000 inhabitants. Present day Lanzarote consists of two quite distinct massifs: Famara in the north, and Los Ajaches in the south, where centuries of erosion have sculpted abrupt cliffs and deep ravines, contrasting sharply with the smoothly rounded hills of the island's central region.
    • Day 138 - At Sea
    • Day 139 - Casablanca, Morocco Casablanca, located on the Atlantic coast, is with 4 million inhabitants Morocco's largest city, and at the same time the largest port in Africa. Built on the site of ancient Phoenician Anfa, it remained a small fishing village for many centuries until the French arrived in 1912. Since then Casablanca has become a vast modern city, ever on the increase since Morocco's independence from France in 1956. A successful blend of oriental-style, white cubic dwellings with modern Moroccan quarters gives the city an interesting flair. Lovely beaches and attractive hotels make for a popular year-round holiday resort. To help understand Moroccan culture a visit to the Medina, the quaint old Moorish quarter, is a must for all visitors.
    • Day 140 - At Sea
    • Day 141 - At Sea
    • Day 142 - Barcelona, Spain Barcelona, the capital of Catalonia, is said to have been founded by the Phoenicians, and was once the rival of the powerful states of Venice and Genoa for control of the Mediterranean trade. Today, it is Spain's second largest city and has long rivaled, even surpassed Madrid in industry and commerce. The medieval atmosphere of the Gothic Quarter and the elegant boulevards combine to make the city one of Europe's most beautiful. Barcelona's active cultural life and heritage brought forth such greats as the architect Antonio Gaudi, the painter Joan Miro, and Pablo Picasso, who spent his formative years here. Other famous native Catalan artists include cellist Pau Casals, surrealist Salvador Dali, and opera singers Montserrat Caballe and Josep Carreras. Barcelona accomplished a long-cherished goal with the opportunity to host the Olympics in 1992. This big event prompted a massive building program and created a focal point of the world's attention.

    Deck Layout

    Deck 4
    Deck 10
    Deck 11
    Deck 2
    Deck 9
    Deck 7
    Deck 8
    Deck 5
    Deck 6
    Deck 3
    Travel now, pay later
    0% 9 months interest free†
    Weekly
    $2308*
    Monthly
    $10000*
    • *ALL PRICES STATED ARE PER PERSON BASED ON DOUBLE OCCUPANCY AND INCLUDE TAXES, FEES & PORT EXPENSES. Fares are in Australian dollars. Promotional Full World Cruise Amenities are valid for guests who book the Full World Cruise for 140-days only. Bookings must be made prior to May 31, 2020 to be eligible for the Full World Cruise Amenities. Full World Cruise Amenities are applicable to the first and second guests in a Suite only, third and fourth guests are not eligible unless specifically indicated. Air Amenity: Complimentary roundtrip air is offered on select flights from select Australian gateways and includes business class service. Air must be booked through Seabourn’s Flight Ease Program. Air can be booked as early as 330-days from the sailing return date and must be booked no later than 30-days prior to sailing. Air seats are limited and may not be available on every flight. Once air is booked, guests are responsible for checking the airline’s website or contacting the airline directly for information regarding rules, restrictions, baggage fees and other charges. Guests are responsible for all baggage fees, including excess baggage imposed directly by the airline. Shipboard Credit Amenity: Shipboard credits are in U.S. Dollars, are non-refundable, non-transferable, have no cash value, expire at the end of the cruise, may not be used in the casino and are not combinable with other shipboard credit offers. Ocean View and Veranda Suites, categories V6 and below, will receive Shipboard Credit of $4,000USD per suite ($2,000USD per person). Penthouse and Premium Suites, categories PH, PS, OW, SS, WG & GR, will receive Shipboard Credit of $6,000USD per suite ($3,000USD per person). Unlimited Internet Package Amenity: Complimentary Unlimited Internet Package includes (1) unlimited internet package per Suite. Internet service is not guaranteed. Seabourn is not responsible if internet service is unavailable. No credit or other compensation will be provided should internet service not be available. Private Car Transfers Amenity: Guests utilizing Seabourn’s Flight Ease program will be eligible for complimentary transfers. This includes round-trip transfers between home and airport, airport and hotel, hotel and ship. Round-trip transfers between home and airport are limited to 100 miles and are valid for select Australian cities/airports. Personal Valet® Luggage Amenity: Complimentary Personal Valet® door-to-door luggage service applies to guests residing in Australia only. Luggage is restricted to 2 bags per guest at 50lbs per bag. Certain restrictions apply. Reduced Deposit Offer: 50% reduced deposit is valid for bookings made prior to March 31, 2020. Offer is applicable to all guests sharing a Suite. Pay in Full Offer: Guests who pay in full by May 31, 2020 will save an additional 3 percent from the gross cruise-only promotional fare. Offer is applicable to all guests sharing a Suite. Return World Cruise Guests Offer: Guests who have a valid booking on the full 2020 World Cruise are eligible for five percent (5%) discount off a full-priced booking on Seabourn’s 2021 World Cruise. Discount does not apply to taxes, fees or port expenses. Offer is subject to validation. If guest cancels the qualifying 2020 World Cruise booking at any time, discount may be reversed and guest will be charged the difference between full-fare and discounted fare at the time of reversal. All Amenities and Offers are capacity controlled and may be modified or withdrawn at any time without prior notice. Other restrictions may apply. Seabourn reserves the right to correct errors. To be read in conjunction with the Seabourn Passage contract www.seabourn.com which guests will be bound by. Whilst all information is correct at time of publication, offers are subject to change or withdrawal. Carnival plc trading as Carnival Australia ABN 23 107 998 443 as agent for Seabourn. Ships' registry: Bahamas. ©2019 Seabourn.
    • The following product terms and conditions apply in addition to our Booking Terms and Conditions (available on our website) and terms and conditions of the relevant travel service provider.
    • Prices quoted valid for sale until 31 May 2020 for travel during the period specified (if applicable) unless otherwise stated or sold out prior.
    • All prices are per person (unless otherwise stated), subject to availability and may be withdrawn or varied without notice. Accommodation (if included) is based on twin share unless otherwise stated.
    • Advertised price includes bonus nights and/or stated saving (if applicable).
    • Additional supplier conditions and travel restrictions may apply. Please enquire for further details.
    • Airfare (including internal flights) is not included unless otherwise stated and, if included, is economy class unless otherwise stated.
    • Components of the total price including local payments, "resort fees", "national park fees", "trip kitties" and food funds (if applicable) may be payable direct to the supplier on arrival or to your travel consultant prior to your departure. Where applicable, these payments are included in the total price quoted.
    • Gratuities are not included unless otherwise stated.
    • Prices shown are fully inclusive of taxes, levies and government charges current at the time of publication.
    • Additional levies, government charges & other applicable fees, including additional taxes, surcharges and visa fees specific to your departure date or flight routing, may apply and are beyond our control.
    • Seasonal surcharges and blackout dates may apply depending on date of travel.
    • Prices shown are for payments made by cash in store or by BPAY.
    • Payments made in store by credit card will incur a surcharge (see Booking Terms and Conditions for further details).
    • These prices are a guide to the best price and are subject to change without notice, due to matters outside our control, such as adverse currency fluctuations, fuel surcharges, taxes and airfare increases. Please enquire for further details..

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    Why choose Flight Centre?


    Not only do we have an incredible, worldwide team with decades of experience and a genuine passion for travel, we also have the widest choice of travel options covering tours, cruises, holiday packages and more. Flight Centre gives you free holiday planning and personalised service, Interest Free* Holiday Finance so you can book now, pay later, and 24/7 worldwide customer care on 133 133.