A Foodie's Long Weekend In Hong Kong

10 May 2015
Read Time: 2.6 mins

Hong Kong is a city that loves to eat, where the next meal or the snack in between is never far from your mind and there’s something to tempt on every corner.

With this three-day eating plan you’ll sample some of Hong Kong’s best, taste local and international favourites and work your way through the city’s best views.

Day 1

Start your Hong Kong day with a Japanese buffet breakfast at Inakaya (Shop A, 101/F, ICC, 1 Austin Road West, Tsim Sha Tsui) and settle in to enjoy the panoramic views. As well as sushi and sashimi stations, the teppanyaki station has plenty of foie gras on hand.

At the Park Hotel’s Park Café (61-65 Chatham Road South, Tsim Sha Tsui) try their buffet selection of popular local dishes such as Hainanese chicken rice or pork knuckle with ginger, and finish with osmathus jelly or red bean green tea roll.

 There's something to eat at every corner (Image: Getty)

How about the world’s cheapest Michelin-starred restaurant for dinner? Dim sum restaurant Tim Ho Wan (Fuk Wing Street, Sham Shui Po) was started by former Four Seasons Hong Kong chef Mak Kwau Pui and now has a branch in Sydney.

Must tries here include the steamed egg cake, which is Mak’s favourite, pan-fried turnip cake and vermicelli roll stuffed with pig’s liver.

Still hungry? An egg tart, made with either a biscuit or flaky pastry base and filled with egg custard, will fill the gap.

Day 2

Catch the tram to The Peak and breakfast at award winning Pacific Coffee where the views of Hong Kong’s city and harbour also are a winner.

Feel like some modern British cuisine for lunch? Head to Aberdeen Street Social at PMQ (35 Aberdeen Street, Central), Hong Kong’s new centre for creative locals and a restaurant from British Michelin star chef Jason Atherton.

Upstairs is a contemporary restaurant with an outdoor patio overlooking the gardens while downstairs there is all day dining plus a cocktail bar and a spot to pick up pastries, cakes and gelati.

 Catch the tram to The Peak for breakfast (Image: Getty)

You’ll need a door code to get into funky rooftop bar and casual eatery Fu Lu Shou, (Level 7, 31 Hollywood Road, Central) where you’ll find old school Chinese food including lemon chicken and prawn toast for dinner.

The house specialty is ‘big-arsed’ steamed dim sims recreated from the owner’s 1970s Australian dining memories.

Snack on wife cakes, a bun filled with sweet winter melon paste, which you’ll find at Chinese bakery shops around the city.


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Day 3

You’re off to breakfast on Hong Kong Island to discover some of the best pancakes around at La Creperie (1GF, 69 Jervois Street, Sheung Wan). Their sweet crepes, particularly the highly popular salted caramel, have plenty of fans.

Lunch at Bread Street Kitchen (Mezzanine Floor, LKF Hotel, 33 Wyndham Street, Lan Kwai Fong, Central) will have you sitting down to the best of British, Gordon Ramsay style.

Dive into beer battered cod with crushed peas and hand cut chips, rib eye steak and honey glazed beef short ribs. With a base of imported British artisanal products supplemented by top produce gathered from throughout Australasia, the kitchen pumps out the same dishes you’ll find in their London restaurant but with the touch of Asia.

 Bustling Hong Kong is home to more than 80 Michelin-starred restaurants (Image: Getty)

Ho Lee Fook (1-5 Elgin Street, Central), which means good fortune for your mouth, is a restaurant headed by Chef Jowett Yu, who hails from Sydney’s Mr Wong and Ms G’s.

The dinner menu is inspired by old school Hong Kong and the spirit of late-night Chinatown hangouts in 1960s New York.

Highlights include mom’s mostly cabbage with a little bit of pork dumplings, Kurobuta pork char-siu and, from the dessert menu, Breakfast 2.0 with Horlicks ice cream, cornflake honey joy and topped with longan and cocoa coffee crumbs.

Still hungry? Try one of the large green and white wrapped, lolly-shaped treats that reveal pitted, dried prunes.  They are sweet and sour at the same time and are reputed to be good for your health.

Hong Kong is a dining adventure with more than 80 Michelin-starred restaurants. How many can you tick off on your list?

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Visit your local Flight Centre or call 131 600 for more advice and the latest deals on travelling to Hong Kong.

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Kerry Heaney

Kerry Heaney is a food sherpa searching the world for ultimate tastes to share. As a freelance food and travel writer/editor, her tough job is writing about the things she most loves doing. See where she has been lately at www.eatdrinkandbekerry.blogspot.com.