Top 5 Haunted Australian Attractions

29 October 2012

Halloween is almost upon us. And by now I am sure that you have already sorted the perfect outfit for trick-or-treating - whether it be a witch, goblin, vampire or poltergeist. But here at Flight Centre, we thought you might like to use this Halloween as inspiration to explore destinations that boast paranormal activity.

Here are our top five haunted places around Australia.

 Old Melbourne Gaol

Newstead House, Brisbane
Completed in 1846, the historic Newstead House is the city's oldest residence and stands majestically overlooking the Brisbane River. However the ornate colonial exterior shelters unexplained sightings that lead to only one conclusion. Many visitors describe a feeling of being watched as they walk through the rooms, while other people believe they see a young lady in the girl's bedroom and a man has been observed near the verandah.

Old Melbourne Gaol, Melbourne
Most famous for the site where Ned Kelly was hung in 1880, the Old Melbourne Gaol was opened in 1842 and housed some of the city's most nefarious criminals until is closure in 1929. Around 130 prisoners were executed within the grounds; so it's little wonder that the spirit of the condemned continue to wander the corridors.

Richmond Bridge, Tasmania
The Richmond Bridge, just outside Hobart, is haunted by George Grover, a Task Master, who met an untimely death after he was supposedly pushed by convicts in 1832 that he had previously whipped during its construction. Remarkably, the original bridge remains and sightings of Grover's ghost are common.

Quarantine Station, Sydney
With a stunning outlook over Sydney Harbour, the former Quarantine Station built on north head near Manly has a long history of supernatural activity. Visitors claim to have seen ghostly apparitions and hear unexplainable noises. The site was in operation from 1832 until its decommission in 1984.

Old Fannie Bay Gaol, Darwin
Darwin's principle correctional institution between in 1883 and 1979 was the Old Fannie Bay Gaol. Today the site is open as a museum, where visitors are free to admire the architecture of the various building including a room that houses the gallows that were used in the final on-site execution in 1952. It's not surprising that many travellers report eerie sounds coming from the various structures as they stroll through the grounds.

Lyndon Barnett

Guided by curiosity and a sense of adventure, Lyndon travelled independently to 69 countries on six continents. As such, travel is Lyndon's only addiction. He enjoys with equal measure - scaling the peaks of a South American mountain at altitude, attending opera in a European Opera House or hunting for a bargain in an Asian market.